Commission History - CCCC

Commission History

2013 Commission Action

  • On June 19, 2013, the Commission met and voted to increase the elected officials' salaries by five percent effective December 2, 2013. 

2012 Commission Action

  • On May 31, 2012, the Commission met and voted to reduce elected officials' salaries five percent effective December 3, 2012.

2011 Commission Action

  • On April 14, 2011, the Commission met and voted to provide a $300 per month car allowance for legislators, replacing the State-paid vehicle and gas card.

2010 Commission Action

  • On June 16, 2010, the Commission met and voted to allow adjustment of the State-paid portion of the health benefits.

2009 Commission Action

  • On June 30, 2009, the Commission met and voted to reduce by 18 percent the State's contributions for health and other insurance benefits, and the legislators' auto allowance and per diem.

  • On May 20, 2009, the Commission met and voted to decrease elected officials' salaries 18 percent effective December 7, 2009.

  • On April 29, 2009, the Commission met but didn't pass a resolution; the Commission decided to meet again before June 30 to vote on salary and benefit changes, if any.

2008 Commission Action

The first meeting was held April 22, 2008 in Van Nuys. Charles Murray, Chair, requested a legal opinion on whether the commission can reduce salaries, and if so, how it can be done. A second meeting is to be scheduled late May early June to consider the move.

A second meeting was held June 10, 2008 in Sacramento. The Commission voted to freeze salaries and benefits.

2007 Commission Action

Four new members were appointed to the Commission in early June. The Commission met on June 18, 2007, and voted unanimously to provide a 5% raise to the Constitutional Offices of Attorney General and Superintendent of Public Instruction, and a 2.75% raise to the remaining Constitutional Offices, including the Members, Board of Equalization, and the Legislature.

Elected officials received a 2.75% to 5% salary increase effective December 7, 2007 as follows:

Speaker of the Assembly
Prior Salary: $130,062
Increased Salary: $133,639
 
President Pro Tem of the Senate
Prior Salary: $130,062
Increased Salary: $133,639
 
Minority Floor Leader
Prior Salary: $130,062
Increased Salary: $133,639
 
Majority Floor Leader
Prior Salary: $121,580
Increased Salary: $124,923
 
Second Ranking Minority Leader
Prior Salary: $121,580
Increased Salary: $124,923
 
All Other Legislators
Prior Salary: $113,098
Increased Salary: $116,208

 

2006 Commission Action

The Commission met once and voted to provide an 18% raise to all Constitutional Officers, including the Members, Board of Equalization; and a 2% raise to Legislators.

Salaries prior to December 4 2006, and the new salaries including the 2-18% increase, effective December 4, 2006, were as follows:

Speaker of the Assembly
Prior Salary: $127,512
2% to 18% Salary Increase: $130,062
 
President Pro Tem of the Senate
Prior Salary: $127,512
2% to 18% Salary Increase: $130,062

 

Minority Floor Leader
Prior Salary: $127,512
2% to 18% Salary Increase: $130,062
 
Majority Floor Leader
Prior Salary: $119,196
2% to 18% Salary Increase: $121,580

 

Second Ranking Minority Leader
Prior Salary: $119,196
2% to 18% Salary Increase: $121,580

 

All Other Legislators
Prior Salary: $110,880
2% to 18% Salary Increase: $113,098

 

2005 Commission Action

The Commission met once and voted unanimously to provide a 12 percent increase in the salaries of the State Legislators, to become effective December 5, 2005.

Salaries prior to December 5, 2005, and the new salaries including the 12% increase, effective December 5, 2005, were as follows:

Speaker of the Assembly
Prior Salary: $113,850
12% Salary Increase: $127,512

 

President Pro Tem of the Senate
Prior Salary: $113,850
12% Salary Increase: $127,512
 
Minority Floor Leader
Prior Salary: $113,850
12% Salary Increase: $127,512

 

Majority Floor Leader
Prior Salary: $106,425
12% Salary Increase: $119,196

 

Second Ranking Minority Leader
Prior Salary: $106,425
12% Salary Increase: $119,196

 

All Other Legislators
Prior Salary: $99,000
12% Salary Increase: $110,880

 

2004 Commission Action

The Commission met once and decided not to change elected officers' salaries and benefits.

 

2003 Commission Action

The Commission met once and decided not to change elected officers' salaries and benefits.

 

2002 Commission Action

The Commission met once and decided not to change elected officers' salaries and benefits.

 

2001 Commission Action

The Commission met once and decided not to change elected officers' salaries and benefits.

 

2000 Commission Action

The Commission met once and voted to (1) increase the Governor's salary from $165,000 to $175,000 and (2) increase the salaries of other constitutional officers by an equal percentage amount (slightly more that six percent).

The legislative leadership pay differentials were adjusted so that the minority leader in each house would receive the fifteen- percent differential (rather than 7.5%). In addition, the second ranking minority leader in each house was granted a 7.5% leadership differential. With these changes, the majority and minority leaders in each house (four leaders) will receive the fifteen- percent differential, while the second ranking majority and minority leaders in each house (four additional leaders) will receive the 7.5% differential.

There was discussion of changing the pay relationships among State officers, but it was decided to defer consideration of this until the 2001 meeting.

1999 Commission Action

The Commission met once and re-established the legislative pay differentials. A 7.5% differential was approved for the majority and minority floor leaders and a 15% differential was approved for the two house leaders. No other changes were made in elected State officer salaries.

1998 Commission Action

The Commission held three meetings dealing with a series of issues, including the internal pay relationships among State officers, the relationship between legislative session per diem and legislative salaries, legislative leadership pay, and possible pay incentives for the timely passage of the State budget. At the third of these meetings (March 26, 1998), the Commission adopted State officer pay increases, generally ranging from 26 to 34 percent. The legislative leadership pay differentials were eliminated. A fourth meeting was held on April 30, 1998 to review the pay increases, but a vote to overturn the increases failed. The Commission did pass a resolution supporting pay increases for State employees.

1997 Commission Action

The Commission granted a four- percent salary increase to all State officers except legislative leaders. It also agreed to devote one or more 1998 meetings to in depth discussion of State officer pay issues, including legislative leadership pay, legislative session per diem, and Constitutional officer salary relationships.

1996 Commission Action

The Commission reviewed the internal salary relationships among the State's elected officers and decided not to change them. It also considered motions for general increases in their salaries (3% and 1.5%). However these motions failed to pass due to member concerns about continuing State and local government budget problems. The Commission did authorize the Legislature to establish a member-paid long-term care plan, similar to that available to officers and employees in the executive branch of State government. 

1995 Commission Action

General Pay Adjustment

With the legislative pay rate established at 60 percent, the Commission's 1995 meeting focused on the issue of how the elected officer pay structure, as a whole, should be adjusted to keep pace with general salary and cost-of-living trends. After reviewing historical data on the Employment Cost Index, Consumer Price Index, and State employee salary increases, the Commission decided on a 5 percent general increase in elected officer salaries. This took effect in December 1995. No changes were made in elected officer benefits.

1994 Commission Action

Legislative Pay Adjustment

In 1994, the Commission took up the legislative pay issue remaining from 1990 - whether the basic pay rate for members of the Legislature should be raised to 55 or 60 percent of the Governor's salary. After considering a variety of factors, including pay rates for members of boards of supervisors in large California counties, management level pay in the Executive and Judicial Branches of California government, and private sector pay for mid-management jobs, the Commission increased the pay rate for members of the Legislature to $72,000, 60 percent of the Governor's salary, with corresponding increases for the floor and house leaders.

1993 Commission Action

The Commission met and decided not to change elected officer salaries and benefits because of the State's fiscal and economic problems.
The Commission reviewed legislative leadership compensation practices in other states, as well as several factors that had been raised in public testimony as being things that the Commission should consider in setting legislative pay rates. The latter included legislative per diem, benefits, and car allowances.
 

1992 Commission Action

The Commission met and decided not to change elected officer salaries and benefits because of the State's fiscal and economic problems.
The Commission reviewed legislative leadership compensation practices in other states, as well as several factors that had been raised in public testimony as being things that the Commission should consider in setting legislative pay rates. The latter included legislative per diem, benefits, and car allowances.
 

1991 Commission Action

The Commission met and decided not to change elected officer salaries and benefits because of the State's fiscal and economic problems.
The Commission reviewed legislative leadership compensation practices in other states, as well as several factors that had been raised in public testimony as being things that the Commission should consider in setting legislative pay rates. The latter included legislative per diem, benefits, and car allowances.

 

1990 Commission Action

Establishment

The California Citizens Compensation Commission was established in June 1990 through the voters' passage of Proposition 112. The Proposition gave it independent responsibility for determining the salaries and benefits for California's elected officers, including the Governor and members of the Legislature. Prior to 1990, the Legislature determined elected officer salary levels.

Initial meetings - Fall 1990

The Commission held five meetings in the Fall of 1990, leading to its first salary determinations, which took effect on December 3, 1990. These were based on the following:

After a review of salaries paid to Governors in other large states and to top executives in public jurisdictions within California, the salary for Governor was set at $120,000 per year. (From $85,000).

After reviewing elected officer salary structures in other large States and studying the roles and relative levels of responsibility for California's elected officers, the Commission determined that the Attorney General and Superintendent of Public Instruction should be paid at 85 percent of the Governor's salary ($102,000) and that the other "Constitutional" officers (Lieutenant Governor, Secretary of State, Controller, and Treasurer) should receive 75 percent of the Governor's salary ($90,000).

The Commission also determined that the four elected members of the Board of Equalization and the Insurance Commissioner should be paid at the 75 percent level. However, since their annual salaries were already $95,052, the Commission decided to freeze their pay until future structure increases absorbed the difference.

The salary for legislators was set at $52,500, 43.75 percent of the Governor's salary, with an agreement to give future consideration to whether this should be raised to 55 or 60 percent. The Commission also established new pay rates for Assembly Speaker/Senate President Pro Tem (20 percent above the basic member rate) and majority/minority floor leader (10 percent above the member rate).

Finally, the Commission found that elected officer benefits (health and dental insurance, etc.) were at appropriate levels and decided to continue them without change.

Salaries of Elected Officials

Salaries of elected officials.

 


Updated 5/14/2013