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Energy Commission Specialist/Supervisor (Forecasting) Series

Energy Commission Specialist/Supervisor (Forecasting) Series

California State Personnel Board Specification

Series established December 16, 1976

Scope

This series describes six specialty classes used in the Energy Resources Conservation and Development Commission to perform or supervise technical, professional work in energy forecasting.

 

Energy Commission Specialist/Supervisor (Forecasting) Series Specification - Class Titles and Codes
Schem Code Class Code Class
BJ84 4598 Associate Energy Specialist (Forecasting)
BJ52 4947 Energy Commission Specialist I (Forecasting)
BJ22 4928 Energy Commission Supervisor I (Forecasting) (Abolished 02/02/2017 per Pay Letter 17-11)
BJ42 4948 Energy Commission Specialist II (Forecasting)
BJ07 4599 Energy Commission Supervisor II (Forecasting)
BJ32 4949 Energy Commission Specialist III (Forecasting)

Definition of Series

The work performed by nonsupervisory classes ranges from the full journey level to the highest level of technical advisor to the Commission on program and policy issues. Supervisory classes consists of two levels which provide first and second levels of staff supervision. Incumbents conduct, monitor or supervise various technical, regulatory and/or scientific projects, studies and programs undertaken by the Commission. Work is technical in nature and involves analytical, consultative and advisory services to evaluate and regulate the various programs and policies that are developed and administered by the Commission.

 

Incumbents either perform or supervise work to ascertain future energy problems and uncertainties affecting electricity and fuels, and develop actions to ensure the availability of sufficient, secure and affordable electric energy and fuels supplies for California; prepare or revise long-range supply, demand and price forecasts for electricity, petroleum, petroleum products, natural gas, coal and alternative fuels; perform complex, technical and analytical work in the field of forecasting and analysis; provide technical analysis to the Commission, the electric and gas utilities and other interested parties; analyze the consequences of these forecasts for transportation, residential, industrial, utility, and other end-use sectors; develop, maintain and enhance electricity and fuels forecasting models; and review and critique the electricity and fuels forecasts of others.

 

Incumbents in either supervisory or nonsupervisory positions develop State energy policies for the Biennial Report, Fuels Report and Shortage Contingency Plan; evaluate the consequences to California of emerging electricity and fuels use availability and cost trends in transportation, residential, industrial, utility and other end-use sectors; develop policy approaches for critical electricity and fuel-use issues, such as transportation, energy security and deregulation; assess the value to California of existing and proposed fuels regulations and policies; identify administrative and legislative actions to ensure sufficient, secure and affordable electrical energy and fuel supplies to California; represent and communicate Commission positions on fuels issues before other State and Federal agencies; develop and maintain an information and knowledge base on current electricity and fuels supply, demand and price for use in policy development and forecasting and for public dissemination; collect and verify fuels and energy data in accordance with relevant statutes; prepare and publish derivative statistics; develop and maintain an integrated picture of California's electricity and fuels and energy economy from resource extraction through consumption; and prepare written and oral reports on forecasting topics.

 

Incumbents develop policies and programs to implement or update the California Energy Shortage Contingency Plan; help ensure operational readiness of California's Energy Emergency Response Program; and participate in State, regional and local energy emergency coordination bodies.

 

Incumbents perform thermodynamic calculations and other calculations that utilize pert, linear programming, and cost/benefit analysis. Incumbents use various statistical techniques, including ordinary and two-stage least squares regression, auto-correlation, significant tests, correlation and analysis of residuals; write and analyze computer programs and models, utilizing econometrics; and use micro-and macro-economic theory; preparing written and oral reports on forecasting topics; and creatively improving existing forecast methods and data.

 

Other duties may include recommending changes in supervising and performing code changes and related forecasting activities; choosing electricity, fuels and other related energy forecasting models; writing forecasting reports; testifying in Commission hearings; improving the energy forecasting state of�the art; and innovative use of forecasting methodologies in new applications.

Entry Level

Entry into this series is typically from the Energy Analyst classification.

Definition of Levels*

Associate Energy Specialist (Forecasting)

This is the full journeyperson level in the class series. Incumbents independently perform responsible, varied and complex technical and analytical work.

 

Positions at this level are nonsupervisory but may serve as lead over lower-level technical and analytical staff.

Energy Commission Specialist I (Forecasting)

Specialist I positions are characterized by incumbents independently performing more complex, sensitive and responsible energy-related work which requires, on a regular basis, a high level of knowledge, skill and ability which is demonstrably above the journey level.

 

Incumbents in this class will usually possess technical expertise in one or more energy-related fields. Incumbents perform a broad range of duties within the program specialty. Incumbents may exercise some lead responsibility as Project Managers. Incumbents may be responsible for minor Commission reports and may lead other Energy Commission Specialists�I in carrying out project responsibility.

Energy Commission Supervisor I (Forecasting)

This is the first supervisory level of the series. Incumbents are working supervisors responsible for planning, supervising and directing a small staff of scientific/technical positions. Incumbents typically exercise the full range of supervisory responsibility over 3-5 technical/professional staff at the Energy Analyst and Associate Energy Specialist level.

Energy Commission Specialist II (Forecasting)

Specialist II positions are identified by top Commission management as requiring the service of the most highly skilled practitioners who serve as prime resources and innovators in energy-related subjects which are the most sensitive and complex due to the rapid development in the subject area, extremely high legislative and media attention and multistate impact.

 

Incumbents provide expert guidance on highly complex and technical problems; and provide expert consultation services within the area of expertise.

 

Incumbents may also serve as project leaders to address broad national issues such as global warming. Such major projects are characterized by their multidisciplinary scope and/or interstate impact.

 

One incumbent may also serve as the CEC's Assistant Demand Forecaster.

Energy Commission Supervisor II (Forecasting)

This is the second supervisory level of the series, typically responsible for two or more small units, with a total minimum of six professional staff. Typically, the staff will be at the Energy Analyst through Energy Commission Specialist I level and include direct supervision of Energy Commission Supervisor I positions. In the more complex and technical functional areas, staff at the Associate Energy Specialist level and above may report directly to the Energy Commission Supervisor II, provided that the minimum staff size requirement is met.

 

Incumbents supervise and direct technical employees and have major program responsibilities in the more complex and technical functional areas of an office either directly or through Energy Commission Supervisors I.

Energy Commission Specialist III (Forecasting)

This is the highest level of specialist assignment in the series intended to accommodate the broadest and most advanced levels of expertise required and to act as a technical advisor to the Commission on program and policy issues.

 

Incumbents provide expert consultation in a broad range of technical and functional areas of policy development to top administration; make policy recommendations affecting program direction; and provide testimony to legislative bodies, outside agencies and Commission committees.

Minimum Qualifications

All Levels:

The following education is required when non-California state service experience is used to qualify at any level.

 

Equivalent to graduation from college. Additional experience may be substituted for the required education on a year-for-year basis.

Associate Energy Specialist (Forecasting)

Either I

 

One year of experience in the California state service performing forecasting duties in areas related to supply and demand of electricity, fuels, transportation and other energy uses; energy pricing; shortage contingency planning; including duties such as econometric modeling, linear programming, and cost benefit analysis at a level of responsibility equivalent to Energy Analyst, Range C. (Applicants who have completed six months of service performing the duties as specified above will be admitted to the examination but they must satisfactorily complete one year of this experience before they can be eligible for appointment.)

Or II

 

Three years of responsible technical experience in one or more of the areas described in Pattern I above, including two years of experience above the trainee level. A master's degree in a field related to one of the specialties may be substituted for one year of experience; while a doctoral degree may be substituted for two years of the required experience. Only one postgraduate degree may be counted towards experience. (Completion of dissertation research for a doctoral degree in a field appropriate to one of the Energy Commission specialties may be substituted for up to one year of the required experience.)

Energy Commission Specialist I (Forecasting)

Either I

 

One year of experience in the California state service performing forecasting duties in areas related to supply and demand of electricity, fuels, transportation and other energy uses; energy pricing; shortage contingency planning; including duties such as econometric modeling, linear programming, and cost benefit analysis at a level of responsibility equivalent to Associate Energy Specialist.

Or II

 

Four years of responsible technical experience in one or more of the areas described in Pattern I above, including three years of experience above the trainee level. A master's degree in a field related to one of the specialties may be substituted for one year of experience; while a doctoral degree may be substituted for two years of the required experience. Only one postgraduate degree may be counted towards experience. (Completion of dissertation research for a doctoral degree in a field appropriate to one of the Energy Commission specialties may be substituted for up to one year of the required experience.)

 

(Experience in the California state service applied toward this pattern must include at least one year performing the duties in a class with a level of responsibility equivalent to Associate Energy Specialist.)

Energy Commission Supervisor I (Forecasting)

Either I

 

One year of experience in the California state service performing forecasting duties in areas related to supply and demand of electricity, fuels, transportation and other energy uses; energy pricing; shortage contingency planning; including duties such as econometric modeling, linear programming, and cost benefit analysis at a level of responsibility equivalent to Associate Energy Specialist.

Or II

 

Four years of responsible technical experience in one or more of the areas described in Pattern I above, including three years of experience above the trainee level. A master's degree in a field related to one of the specialties may be substituted for one year of experience; while a doctoral degree may be substituted for two years of the required experience. Only one postgraduate degree may be counted towards experience. (Completion of dissertation research for a doctoral degree in a field appropriate to one of the Energy Commission specialties may be substituted for up to one year of the required experience.)

 

(Experience in the California state service applied toward this pattern must include at least one year performing the duties in a class with a level of responsibility equivalent to Associate Energy Specialist.)

Energy Commission Specialist II (Forecasting)

Either I

 

One year of experience in the California state service performing forecasting duties in areas related to supply and demand of electricity, fuels, transportation and other energy uses; energy pricing; shortage contingency planning; including duties such as econometric modeling, linear programming, and cost benefit analysis at a level of responsibility equivalent to Energy Commission Specialist I.

Or II

 

Two years of experience in the California state service performing forecasting duties in areas related to supply and demand of electricity, fuels, transportation and other energy uses; energy pricing; shortage contingency planning; including duties such as econometric modeling, linear programming, and cost benefit analysis at a level of responsibility equivalent to Associate Energy Specialist.

Or III

 

Five years of responsible technical experience in one or more of the areas described in Pattern I above, including four years of experience above the trainee level. A master's degree in a field related to one of the specialties may be substituted for one year of experience; while a doctoral degree may be substituted for two years of the required experience. Only one postgraduate degree may be counted towards experience. (Completion of dissertation research for a doctoral degree in a field appropriate to one of the Energy Commission specialties may be substituted for up to one year of the required experience.)

 

(Experience in the California state service applied toward this pattern must include at least one year performing the duties in a class with a level of responsibility equivalent to Energy Commission Specialist I.)

Energy Commission Supervisor II (Forecasting)

Either I

 

One year of experience in the California state service performing forecasting duties in areas related to supply and demand of electricity, fuels, transportation and other energy uses; energy pricing; shortage contingency planning; including duties such as econometric modeling, linear programming, and cost benefit analysis at a level of responsibility equivalent to Energy Commission Specialist I.

Or II

 

Two years of experience in the California state service performing forecasting duties in areas related to supply and demand of electricity, fuels, transportation and other energy uses; energy pricing; shortage contingency planning; including duties such as econometric modeling, linear programming, and cost benefit analysis at a level of responsibility equivalent to Associate Energy Specialist.

Or III

 

Five years of responsible technical experience in one or more of the areas described in Pattern I above, including four years of experience above the trainee level. A master's degree in a field related to one of the specialties may be substituted for one year of experience; while a doctoral degree may be substituted for two years of the required experience. Only one postgraduate degree may be counted towards experience. (Completion of dissertation research for a doctoral degree in a field appropriate to one of the Energy Commission specialties may be substituted for up to one year of the required experience.)

 

(Experience in the California state service applied toward this pattern must include at least one year performing the duties in a class with a level of responsibility equivalent to Energy Commission Specialist I.)

Energy Commission Specialist III (Forecasting)

Either I

 

One year of experience in the California state service performing forecasting duties in areas related to supply and demand of electricity, fuels, transportation and other energy uses; energy pricing; shortage contingency planning; including duties such as econometric modeling, linear programming, and cost benefit analysis at a level of responsibility equivalent to Energy Commission Specialist II.

Or II

 

Two years of experience in the California state service performing forecasting duties in areas related to supply and demand of electricity, fuels, transportation and other energy uses; energy pricing; shortage contingency planning; including duties such as econometric modeling, linear programming, and cost benefit analysis at a level of responsibility equivalent to Energy Commission Specialist I.

Or III

 

Six years of responsible technical experience in one or more of the areas described in Pattern I above, including five years of experience above the trainee level. A master's degree in a field related to one of the specialties may be substituted for one year of experience; while a doctoral degree may be substituted for two years of the required experience. Only one postgraduate degree may be counted towards experience. (Completion of dissertation research for a doctoral degree in a field appropriate to one of the Energy Commission specialties may be substituted for up to one year of the required experience.)

 

(Experience in the California state service applied toward this pattern must include at least one year performing the duties in a class with a level of responsibility equivalent to Energy Commission Specialist II.)

Knowledge and Abilities

All Levels:

Knowledge of: A wide range of electricity, fuels and energy technologies and associated forecasting methodologies and issues; energy demand forecasts and supply analytic methodologies, energy policy issues affecting or resulting from energy technology development, and energy project management techniques; California Public Resource Code pertaining to energy resources conservation and development; principles of physical sciences and engineering involved in fuels and energy production, transmission, utilization and conservation; principles of econometric, engineering and end-use energy demand forecasting, conservation impacts forecasting, fuel and electricity price forecasting, new demand-reducing technologies growth forecasting, computer modeling, statistical sample design, data collection, data base development and monitoring, utility and other forecasting methods; commercially available energy conservation and alternative energy generation technologies; principles of engineering economics, financial analysis, and economic theory as it pertains to energy supply and demand; energy technology costs and cost-accounting methods; industrial energy conversion technologies, thermodynamic analysis of heat loads in buildings, and direct energy use surveys; general provisions of social and economic implications of fuels and energy demand forecasting, resource planning and facility construction; recent research and development projects related to the use of electricity, petroleum, natural gas, biomass and other synthetic fuels; principles and procedures of environmental impact assessment, energy supply and demand forecasting, safety standards review and assessment, and fuels development and utilization; principles of program evaluation and planning and energy policy analysis and formulation; decision theory, probabilistic risk assessment, and techniques of comparative evaluation; and Federal, State and local governments, utilities and private agencies involved in energy forecasting, research and regulation.

 

Ability to: Reason logically and creatively and use a variety of analytical and research techniques to resolve complex electric energy and fuels development, energy conservation and development programs; utilize available computer systems for data base and/or computational applications; develop and use complex computer programs and forecasting models; develop and evaluate fuel alternatives; perform policy analysis and formulate policy recommendations; act as team or project leader; manage contracts; analyze energy data and present ideas and information effectively both orally and in writing; gain and maintain the confidence and cooperation of those contacted during the course of work; acquire and prepare energy use and other data relevant to energy demand forecasting and fuel-related issues; critique and diagnose the performance of energy forecasting and resource planning and policy forecasting models; evaluate and quantify the effect of conservation programs on energy demand; present ideas and analysis cogently and effectively; consult with and advise Office Managers, Division Administrators, Commissioners and other interested members of the State energy community on a wide variety of forecasting and fuel-related subject-matter areas; and analyze situations accurately, take effective action and act independently within the guidelines set forth by the Commission.

Energy Commission Specialist II and III (Forecasting)

Knowledge of: A variety of analytical and research techniques to resolve complex and policy sensitive issues and technical problems; significant trends and issues reported in the energy literature; theory and practice of utility planning and regulation, in general, and as implemented in California; energy efficiency, conservation, planning, forecasting and research methods including problem definition, data acquisition, and analytical techniques; and other Federal, State and local energy-related environmental goals, policies and organizations.

 

Ability to: Coordinate the complex technical work of others, act as a team, project, task or conference leader to analyze the more technical and complex situations accurately and take effective action; establish and maintain project priorities; testify as subject matter expert (forecasting,�fuels, energy policies, major Commission policy reports) before the Commission and other groups; serve as the Commission's top adviser in such areas; effectively employ computer techniques for problem solving; and consult with and advise Commission management on a wide variety of energy forecasting, modeling and fuel-related issues and topics.

Energy Commission Supervisor I and II (Forecasting)

Knowledge of: Principles and practices of employee supervision, development and training; program management, formal and informal aspects of Legislative process; the Commission's Affirmative Action Program objectives; a supervisor' role in the Affirmative Action Program and the processes available to meet affirmative action objectives; principle practices and trends of management and administration such as budget, personnel, planning, program evaluation and related areas; and Federal, State and local environmental goals, policies and organizations.

 

Ability to: Review and constructively critique the work of others; coordinate the work of others, supervise a team of interdisciplinary specialists; effectively utilize interdisciplinary teams in the conduct of studies; review and edit complex technical and other written reports; prepare or direct the preparation of complex reports; manage a complex energy project; establish and maintain project priorities, and develop and effectively use all available resources; and effectively contribute to the Commission's affirmative action objectives.

Class History

Energy Commission Specialist/Supervisor (Forecasting) Series History - Dates Established, Revised, and Title Changed
Class Date Established Date Revised Title Changed
Associate Energy Specialist (Forecasting) 12/16/1976 09/12/1990 09/12/1990
Energy Commission Specialist I (Forecasting) 12/16/1976 09/12/1990 09/12/1990
Energy Commission Supervisor I (Forecasting) (Abolished 02/02/2017 per Pay Letter 17-11) 09/12/1990 -- --
Energy Commission Specialist II (Forecasting) 12/16/1976 09/12/1990 09/12/1990
Energy Commission Supervisor II (Forecasting) 12/16/1976 09/12/1990 09/12/1990
Energy Commission Specialist III (Forecasting) 12/16/1976 09/12/1990 09/12/1990

___________

* Additional information regarding functions performed, complexity factors, and scope of responsibility, is contained in a separate document titled "Allocation Guidelines for the Energy Commission Specialist Series".

  Updated: 4/24/2017
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