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Frequently Asked Questions

 

 

How do you calculate a permanent intermittent (PI) employee’s average hours worked?How do you calculate a permanent intermittent (PI) employee’s average hours worked?<p>​If the PI employee is scheduled to work in the future, the department should compensate him or her for what he or she was scheduled to work. If the PI employee is not scheduled to work in the future, the department should use the average number of hours worked each month for the last 12 months. If the PI employee worked less than 12 pay periods, use the number of pay periods actually worked to find an average as follows:<br> <br>Total the hours of all intermittent time paid for the previous 12 pay periods or pay periods available. Divide the total hours by the applicable number of pay periods to determine the average hours of pay each month. Here are some examples:<br> <br>During the previous 12 pay period, the PI employee worked 1500 hours.<br> <br>1500 ÷ 12 = 125 average hours per month<br> <br>During the previous 12 pay periods, the PI employee worked a total of 1500 hours. However, the PI employee was furloughed and there were no hours worked during June and July of this period. <br> <br>1500 ÷ 10 = 150 average hours per month<br> <br>If the PI employee’s current time base is intermittent but the previous pay periods worked were on a full-time or part-time basis, convert the full or part-time pay periods to hours on the basis of 173.33 hours for full-time or the part-time fraction of 173.33 hours for each pay period. <br><br>Add these numbers to determine hours worked and divide by the applicable number of pay periods to arrive at the average hours of pay each month.<br> </p>
How is TD calculated for a PI employee with a variable work schedule?How is TD calculated for a PI employee with a variable work schedule?<p>​If the PI employee is not on a set schedule, apply the Intermittent IDL formula per Payroll Procedures Manual Section E409 to compute the average number of hours. You then multiply the average number of hours by the PI employee’s hourly wage to determine his or her average monthly gross.<br><br>If the PI employee chooses full supplementation, the TD payment is subtracted from his or her average monthly gross. The difference can be supplemented to equal no more than the PI employee’s established average monthly gross (average hours X hourly rate -TD payment = Supplementation Gross). The supplementation gross is then divided by the PI employee’s hourly rate to determine the amount of leave credits to charge. Example:<br><br>140 (average hours) x $20.00 (hourly rate) = $2,800.00 (average monthly gross)<br><br>State Fund approved TD for 30 days (April 1-30, 2016) and paid the employee.<br> <br>The PI employee would have earned $2800.00 in April 2016, so <br> <br>$2,800.00 minus $1846.00 (TD payment) = $954.00 supplementation gross<br> <br>$954.00 (supplementation gross) ÷ $20.00 (hourly rate) = 47 hours of leave credits must be charged to achieve full supplementation (can only use whole hour increments).</p>
How many hours should a PI employee be credited or paid if he or she is on TD?How many hours should a PI employee be credited or paid if he or she is on TD?<p>​The PI employee should, at a minimum, be credited with the established average number of hours. The total number of hours credited should not exceed the maximum necessary to qualify a pay period (160 hours).<br><br>The California Leave Accounting System (CLAS) will offset automatically and will not post more than the 160 hours necessary to qualify the pay period. If your department does not utilize CLAS, then you may have to manually adjust the hours to ensure that no more than a total of 160 hours is posted.</p>
If a department calculated average hours for TD by going back 12 months and the PI employee worked some hours in the current month, can the combined regular pay and TD exceed the average?If a department calculated average hours for TD by going back 12 months and the PI employee worked some hours in the current month, can the combined regular pay and TD exceed the average?<p>​Yes. Time actually worked in the current month does not affect the average past hours calculated for the TD payment. The average number of calculated hours can be exceeded in a month in which the PI employee physically worked and is entitled to TD. For example:<br> <br>The PI employee’s average number of hours is determined to be 125 hours a month. The first five days of the month, the PI employee worked 40 hours. The PI employee is paid TD for the last 17 work days of the month. Average hours per day are 6 hours; 6 hours x 17 days = 102 hours. The 102 hours plus the 40 hours worked exceeds the 125-hour average.<br><br>The total hours can only exceed the calculated average if the employee is working and receiving TD during the same pay period. </p>
If a PI employee has been off receiving workers’ compensation benefits, then returns to work and suffers a new injury, should the time on IDL and TD be included when calculating a 12-month average?If a PI employee has been off receiving workers’ compensation benefits, then returns to work and suffers a new injury, should the time on IDL and TD be included when calculating a 12-month average?<p>​Yes. Both regular time paid and time paid as IDL and/or TD should be used to calculate the average.</p>
When a PI employee is approved for TD and has received SDI or NDI during some of the preceding 12 months being used to calculate the average hours, how do you calculate the average hours?When a PI employee is approved for TD and has received SDI or NDI during some of the preceding 12 months being used to calculate the average hours, how do you calculate the average hours?<p>​You only add the hours actually worked (and/or paid as IDL/TD) and divide the total by the number of months in which the injured employee received regular pay or IDL/TD. Disregard the months the injured employee was on SDI or NDI.</p>
A PI employee is given a release to return to modified work for four hours a day. Should he or she be scheduled to work his or her regular shift or only a four-hour shift?A PI employee is given a release to return to modified work for four hours a day. Should he or she be scheduled to work his or her regular shift or only a four-hour shift?<p>​The PI employee should be scheduled as though the work-related injury or illness had not occurred. However, the PI employee should only work the number of hours recommended by the doctor. The employee may be entitled to TD benefits for the remaining hours the employee is unable to work.</p>
For a PI employee, does TD count toward length of service, sick leave, annual leave, and vacation accrual?For a PI employee, does TD count toward length of service, sick leave, annual leave, and vacation accrual?<p>​Yes. If the PI employee is receiving TD or IDL payments during a period of time he or she would have been scheduled for work (in-season) then TD counts towards his or her length of service, sick leave, annual leave, and vacation accrual.</p>
If you start paying a PI employee based on the 12-month average or projected number of hours that he or she would be working in the future, do you have to continue paying in that manner through the life of the claim?If you start paying a PI employee based on the 12-month average or projected number of hours that he or she would be working in the future, do you have to continue paying in that manner through the life of the claim?<p>​TD needs to be paid in the same way (12-month average or projected hours) through the life of a claim.</p>
When a holiday occurs in the pay period, how should the holiday credit be calculated for a PI employee or an injured employee on actual time worked?When a holiday occurs in the pay period, how should the holiday credit be calculated for a PI employee or an injured employee on actual time worked?<p>​First determine the period of time the injured employee’s TD payment covered. Multiply the number of work days covered by the TD payment less the holiday by the number of hours credited to the injured employee per day. <br><br>The credited hours are based on your calculation of the injured employee’s average hours per month. This calculation will provide you the number of compensable hours covered by the TD payment. Use the compensated hours to determine the injured employee’s holiday credit in accordance with the information below:<br><br>Hours on pay status during pay period = Holiday pay in hours for each holiday:<br> <br>Hours: 0-10.9 = 0<br>Hours: 11-30.9 = 1<br>Hours: 31-50.9 = 2<br>Hours: 51-70.9 = 3<br>Hours: 71-90.9 = 4<br>Hours: 91-110.9 = 5<br>Hours: 111-130.9 = 6<br>Hours: 131-150.9 = 7<br>Hours: 151 and over = 8<br><br>Exclusive of holiday hours not actually worked.<br><br>For a PI employee, the holiday credit should be added to the hours worked or average hours worked in the last 12 pay periods. For actual time worked employees, the holiday should be counted as one of the 194 working days.<br> <br>If the injured employee received TD and regular pay during the pay period, calculate the compensated hours covered by the TD payment as stated above and add to number of hours compensated for regular pay. Use the total compensated hours to determine the injured employee’s holiday credit in accordance with the  information above. For example:<br> <br>For the September 2016 pay period, State Fund paid the employee for the period 9/1 through 9/7. A holiday fell on 9/5. Five work days less the holiday equals 4 work days. If you credit the injured employee 6 hours a day, you would multiply 4 work days times 6 hours which is 24 compensated hours. <br><br>The injured employee received regular pay from 9/8/04 through 9/30/04 and was compensated for 102 hours. Twenty-four hours (TD) plus 102 hours (regular pay) equals 126 compensated hours for pay period. Based on the  information above, the injured employee would be credited 6 hours for the holiday.<br> <br>Once the injured employee’s average hours per month are identified or he or she already has a pre-designated work schedule then the holiday hours credited are based upon the established average hours per month. The credited hours can be used towards supplementation. </p>

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